Max Mara The Cube with Cameluxe padding

Max Mara is synonymous with camel hair. The legendary coats have been crafted from this sustainable fiber that is collected from the camel as it naturally sheds. The upcycling of this excess give lives to Cameluxe, an ultra-fine material used as insulation for a new generation of The Cube - the integrated system of outerwear and accessories that has been around the “block” a few times.

Max Mara crafted its Autumn-Winter 2021 global campaign with an entirely different mindset, creating video portraits of modern women by a nearly all-female team, understanding that how we work and the values we hold are as important as the product itself.

Portraits of Women directed by Tracy Doyle

Jasmine Xie - Chengdu, China, 8:00 p.m.
Cinematographer: Cecile Zhang.

Portraits of Women captures two subjects on opposite sides of the globe. A diptych of the ritual of dressing, each
subject arms themselves with their Cube with Cameluxe coats before emerging to face the world. In the videos,
the women examine themselves in the mirror in a moment of honest vulnerability, filmed to give the audience the
perspective of being the mirror’s reflection.

Portraits of Women directed by Tracy Doyle

Helena Suric - New York, U.S.A., 8.00 p.m.
Cinematographer: Dagmar Weaver-Madsen.

CAMELUXE

Powered by Imbotex Lab.
CAMELUXE is a new frontier for mindful fashion: discarded camelhair fabrics are upcycled from our legendary coats (and not only) in order to create a warm insulating pad.
Cameluxe challenges conventional notions of the environmental impact of fashion production by repurposing luxury materials that would have otherwise been unused, decreasing energy consumption, the output of waste, water usage, and CO2 emissions.

Max Mara The Cube

Max Mara The Cube, focused on the down jacket, is an integrated system of outerwear and accessories born in 2008. The Max Mara The Cube’s design is so innovative that it has been “boxed” into the display cases at the Berlin State Museums and New York’s FIT, as a “cult object” in the “Fashion and Technology” exhibitions. In a bid to celebrate the research and innovation behind the Max Mara The Cube’s design, we asked three photographers to provide us with their own visual interpretation of the project and provided them with just one prompt: life, cubed.

“What I do when I take photos is I live in the moment. I create situations where something interesting will happen, and by allowing everyone to be part of the creativity you get spontaneous moments”.

Malibu-based artist Tierney Gearon drew inspiration from her Californian surroundings for her second photographic project dedicated to Max Mara The Cube. Live in the moment: this is the principle Gearon follows in her shots, in which she recreates spontaneous moments that allow everyone to get involved and waits for something unexpected to happen.

's Cube 3 Max Mara

“What I do when I take photos is I live in the moment. I create situations where something interesting will happen, and by allowing everyone to be part of the creativity you get spontaneous moments”.

Malibu-based artist Tierney Gearon drew inspiration from her Californian surroundings for her second photographic project dedicated to Max Mara The Cube. Live in the moment: this is the principle Gearon follows in her shots, in which she recreates spontaneous moments that allow everyone to get involved and waits for something unexpected to happen.

Fifteen photographers have interpreted the project: Erik Madigan Heck, Koto Bolofo, Rinko Kawauchi, Hellen Van Meene, Max Farago, Lorenzo Vitturi, Christopher Anderson, Tina Barney, Laurie Simmons, Marilyn Minter, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Stephen Shore, Alex Prager, Tierney Gearon and Joel Meyerowitz.

's Cube Art Cover Max Mara